What to Grow in Autumn (a Beginners Guide)

GrowingVegesAutumn

People keep on asking me what they can plant at this time of year or if they have missed the boat to get anything started. Well my green fingered compadres, you are in luck, there are HEAPS of delicious things you can grow at this time of year. Here is a mighty quick run down to get you going.

First and foremost, get started with any of the members of the Brassica Family. You can go nuts planting things like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli and brussels sprouts at this time of year. If you like to live on the wild side a little, try growing purple cauliflower or broccolini.

Lettuce matures in 4-5 weeks so is happy to keep growing until the first frosts upon which time it will turn into a soggy shrivelly sight to behold (if you have ever had a faulty thermostat on your fridge you will know what I am talking about). If you have a frost free snug place for your lettuce however, it is possible to keep it throughout the winter, but keep in mind that it will do very little growing so you will need muchos lettuce to keep you going.

In lieu of lettuce, Spinach is a great substitute over the colder months and wont shrivel up on you at the first sniff of a frost. Spinach doesn’t do too well in the hot summer weather as it tends to go to seed really quickly so now is a perfect time to grow as the weather is starting to cool down, keep in mind as with lettuce, that the later in the season you plant it, the longer it will take to grow.

Plant carrots now- and lots of em! These guys will stay in the ground throughout winter in a state of carroty hibernation so if you plant enough, you can pick them throughout winter and impress your friends at dinner parties with carrot sticks. They take about 8 weeks to grow, so get them in the ground now to give them enough time to mature.

Plant beetroot now, just like spinach they like a cooler temperature. They can also over-winter (hibernate) but depending on how cold your region gets you might want to put a cover over them as the cold can affect their flavour.

If you are an onion fan, you are in luck, Autumn is THE time for planting onions. If you don’t have much patience like myself, have a look for onion varieties that take less time to mature. I am growing “Purplette” a smaller red onion that matures in 120 days.

Last but not least, plant some radishes, they are the hardiest little balls of earthy goodness and they are by far the easiest thing for a rookie to grow. Try watermelon radishes, they are white on the outside and pink in the middle.

Watermelon Radish

Watermelon Radish

Well the garden is beckoning, I hope those tips were enough to get you started on your autumn gardening endeavours, good luck and happy gardening,

Aimee.

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